DRAG ARTIST OF THE MONTH

After leaving his country at the young age of 11 due to wars and gang violence, he reunited with his mother in Houston and found a passion and outlet that would give him a platform to spread a message. 

 

After doing female impersonation for just 8 months he competed in his first major pageant Miss Gay Arizona America and placed 1st alternate.  Since then, his career has taken off and his message is being delivered.

ArizonaDrag.com is proud to announce our May Drag Artist of the Month 

SICARYA

What was your first experience with the art of female impersonation?

 

My first experience was wrapping the shower towel around my head and pretending it was hair. I think every gay boy did that (Laugh Out Loud) 

My first introduction to drag was in Houston, Texas.  I was a drag fan of local bars and shows.  I would attend almost every show possible, that’s how I became friends with entertainers.  I started helping them in the bars to carry their bags, drive them around, stone outfits.  I would just watch them perform and take notes, and although it was offered to me, I never really felt I was ready to get in drag until early 2017.  I did it four times, but those four times were for benefit shows.  I restarted in November 2018 in Phoenix, Arizona.

Following that first experience, what made you want to get into the profession?

Following those first experiences I got into the profession because of me being involved in the immigrants’ rights movement.  I’ve worked in the non-profit sector for over 10 years and I’ve always organized for different causes, I saw drag as another way to mobilize people and utilize the art form as a platform with a purpose.  That platform and purpose holds true and authentic to who I am and where I come from.

How did you get your name Sicarya?

Before Sicarya, my name was Yara. I changed it to Sicaya “Sicaria” which is a Spanish word and it means assassin or hitman. I chose this name because I kill toxic masculinity! This is important because growing up Latinx and religious your worth most often than not is always measured on how “masculine” you can be or appear to be. This led to me being bullied or being called many names by other people or family members. So, its representation of my past and wanting to actively show how deadly toxic masculinity can be.

What is your style of drag?

 

My drag is inspired by pageantry or as some people call it “old drag”.  I am standing on the shoulders of amazing women and I always seek to honor those who have paved the way.  I love staying true to the old style, big hair, rhinestones, beading, jewelry, body, elegance, and custom-made outfits but adding that modern twist.  I love performing 80’s music.  Old soul young face (Laugh Out Loud)

Does Sicarya come from a Drag family?

 

I wouldn't say a drag family per se. I believe I am a product of my community and experiences. I believe my “drag family” has been all my mentors, performers, and people that have shared their advice, knowledge, and have invested in me.

Do you remember the first song you performed, the first stage, and how you felt about it? 

Rocio Durcal, Ya te Olvide. It was at Viviana's Night Club in Houston, TX. I felt accomplished and fully seen. I probably looked a hot mess but at that moment you couldn't tell me I was not Rocio!

What was your main goal when you became a female impersonator? 

To be the person I needed, wanted to see, or sought for when I was younger.  I want that undocumented central american confused kid to see themselves in me and in a positive light.

What does the art of female impersonation mean to you?

 

Herstory tells us drag is rooted in our collective liberation. Drag is political! Doing drag is telling the world we exist and that we must be our authentic selves all while looking fierce and extra shiny!

What makes you different from any of the other female impersonation impersonators? 


My drag is so much bigger than just myself.  I always seek to show representation in everything I do.  I use this platform with a purpose to organize and expand conversations that are usually not talked about. I want to show and further create pathways for undocumented queer immigrants living here in the US. I always seek to help uplift, highlight, and pull up a chair for those who have not gotten a space at the table.  I do that with every performance, outfit, or opportunity I get.  I believe that is what makes me different from other female impersonators. 

What has been your greatest moment as a female impersonator?

 

 Competing at Miss Gay America in my first 8 months of doing drag has been the greatest and scariest moment by far. 

What was your most embarrassing?

My most embarrassing moment was when I competed in my first pageant in Houston, TX during the presentation category my costume was so big and I accidentally dragged the stage curtains with me. She brought the house down boots! LITERALLY

You’re originally from Ataco, Ahucachapan, El Salvador, then you lived in Houston, Texas before moving to Phoenix, Arizona. You’re a part of the D.A.C.A. How do you use your life experiences in your drag performances? 

El Salvador is part of the Northern Triangle of Central America. A region that has been impacted by wars, gang violence, and militarization. A lot of people don’t know that El Salvador has been highly impacted by the US foreign policy for over 40 years and it has caused major migration waves for a long time. I lost my dad to gang violence at the age of 11 and it is why I was forced to leave my country, by myself as an unaccompanied minor. I lived in Honduras, Guatemala, and almost one year in Mexico and then I crossed to the US to reunite with my mother. 

I grew up in Southwest Houston, I started working at the age of 14 as a dishwasher in a Colombian restaurant. I grew up undocumented, seeing my neighbors and my mom in fear that ICE would come to our neighborhood or that we could be pulled up by the police. We learned to translate our fears into our most powerful shields. 

In 2009 after graduating high school, I was denied a scholarship due to my immigration status. That experience pushed me to connect with local organizing and that’s where my journey began. Congress let us down in 2010 after the Dream Act failed to pass the Senate. DACA was granted to immigrant youth because we fought for it and because we pushed the previous administration to take executive action and we won! I was able to attend the University of Houston Downtown and I graduated with a Bachelor's Degree in Political Science and Fine Arts. DACA it's not permanent, it’s the ability to obtain a work permit and a driver’s license every two years for $495.00-

 

The current administration ended the program in 2017, and currently the program could be taken away if the Supreme Court Decides that. For many of us, politics it's not a “trending topic” or “today’s mood” It's my livelihood, my journey, and the reality that we can be deported to a death sentence. That is why it is so important for me to use this platform to further educate those that have the privilege to vote to do so and to unite more people to change the course of this country. Even in the current crisis, Your worth is based on whether you have a document or not, taxpayer families like mine were left out of any relief due to their status. We have so much work to do!

In your short time doing drag you’ve been very successful. Since moving to Arizona you’ve made quite a splash and become a fan favorite. You’ve become 1st alternate to Miss Gay Arizona America in your first attempt and went on to compete at the national level. How has your experience in Arizona been since moving from Houston? 

Thank you! Arizona is home and has been a school for me. Arizona has allowed me to grow and build a family of people who care for me and who have been key to my success. I am so humbled that the people here have welcomed me with open arms and embraced me I will continue to serve my local community and seek to further put Arizona on the mainstages.

Were pageants always a goal of yours?

 

Yes! I grew up watching all types of pageants, especially Miss Universe. I have attended Miss Universe three times! Then, I learned there were drag pageants and immediately I felt I could prepare and compete in one. Now being part of one I can say everybody should do pageants for the amount of knowledge you learn not just about drag but yourself. It’s such a great school to improve in every aspect of your life!

How was your experience competing at Miss Gay America?

Unforgettable! One of my goals was to bring a message and to deliver who I am. I felt my talent was very well received. I filmed my journey to Miss America through VICE News, we are still working and negotiating with a few New York producers to finish the project. We were fortunate enough to receive national coverage through Telemundo and NBC Network to break the stigma that exists between being Latinx, queer and drag and to further break the barries of representation 

 

You are currently qualified for Miss Gay Arizona America as the reigning Miss Gay Copper City America. What will be different for Sicaraya and what can we expect to see on stage during the pageant?

 

I went to Miss Gay Arizona last year with only 3 months combined of doing drag, I still did not know how to do my make up very well and I only had 4 weeks to prepare from my preliminary to the state competition. I was able to place 1st alternate. Going into this season there has been a lot of growth, learning, and improvement! Time has been on my side this time around so I am making sure that all the feedback I got last year is implemented.

You are currently qualified for Miss Gay Arizona America as the reigning Miss Gay Copper City America. What will be different for Sicaraya and what can we expect to see on stage during the pageant?

 

I went to Miss Gay Arizona last year with only 3 months combined of doing drag, I still did not know how to do my make up very well and I only had 4 weeks to prepare from my preliminary to the state competition. I was able to place 1st alternate. Going into this season there has been a lot of growth, learning, and improvement! Time has been on my side this time around so I am making sure that all the feedback I got last year is implemented.

You call Barbra Seville “Mom” what’s your relationship with Barbra Seville?

 

When I moved to Arizona, I did not know anyone but I attended many of her shows, and one day I showed up to the Big Break. I did not win, but she invited me to her Friday show at the Rock. Barbra, has been a role model, she is a leader who has contributed to making Arizona drag so successful, she helped me to be more visible in the drag community, she has helped me perfect my craft and performances and sometimes she is hard on me but I am so honored to be her daughter and I will work hard to never disappoint her and make sure her legacy lives on.

Who are your drag idols?

 

Wow, so many! Erica Andrews, Tommie Ross, Alyssa Edwards, Shangela, Christina Ross, Asia Ohara, and my mom!

What’s the biggest difference between Adonis and Sicarya?

 

The 6-inch heels lol! I believe both are the same; just an over-glorified, glamorous, elegant, extended version of Adonias. I am just undocumented... she is the Undocumented Diva!

Anything else you would like to add or want the readers of ArizonaDrag.com to know about you?

 

Vote, Organize, and Mobilize! We have so much at stake in 2020, Voting is important, but voting is just the beginning. We must continue to organize locally and continue to uplift and address the issues in our community. Make sure to register for the PEVL early voting by mail! It is a must given our current situation. We won't know what the polls may look like so it’s better to be safe than sorry!

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